Mission 1: Jolly Alpha Five Niner

Each step I take is life and death. Each gulp of oxygen a direct link to not only my future, but the future of many other humans. I hadn’t meant to stumble upon this job, this town. But I did.

It happened on a routine mission flying over to Abel Township with some supplies. Just the regular food, some medical supplies. Nothing crazy, on the surface. Under the surface, I had been told I would be assigned to a top-priority mission once I landed.  Until then I chatted with the liaison from Abel Township, and listened to her confirm our arrival with their base watch station. Yes, everything seemed normal and regular.

Until something flew at us seemingly out of nowhere, blasted loudly to the side of us, and our helicopter crashed. . . hard.

The moment after it happened I couldn’t hear anything except the loud ringing sound of being near an explosion, and I knew something, someone had attacked us. Smoke and fire was everywhere. I looked over to see if the pilot was OK, but it was too late.  He was dead; another number in the count of collateral damage of this new age. My thoughts were muddled as I tried to breathe, tried to inch my way out of my seat. A cut on my forehead was bleeding into my eyes. Everything hurt; my arms and shoulders screamed violently at me, opposed to using their muscles to push my way out;  my legs were temporarily frozen underneath the collapsed objects and tools inside the pilots had left lying around carelessly.  But despite all this, a part of me knew I had to get out.

I clawed my way out onto the ground a lot more slowly than I wished for, and stood up trying to get a sense of where Abel was from our landing. I felt a large stab in my right leg, and looked down to a sharp, jagged metal wire sticking out of it. I yanked it out, wincing as more blood started to flow.  Scanning the horizon again, I finally made out the shape I was looking for off in the distance.

Abel Township.

Definitely reachable at a fast pace on foot, but still far enough to be risky after causing all this noise. I had little choice though; it was either run or wait for the Zombies to come to me.

authorized poster2And they would come. It was only a matter of time. Large amounts of sound and light such as this attracted the bastards. I took one last look inside the helicopter to see if anyone else had survived, but the woman who had chatted so openly before was now void of life–her eyes wide open, questioning the injustice of it all, but empty. I gave it no other second thought and booked it into a decently fast pace. There were no signs yet of them, so I didn’t go full speed in case I needed a burst of energy before I reached the gates. The thought of the gates made me finally waiver in what until now had been an instinctive reflex for survival, and my pace slowed down to almost walking. Please, let them open the gates when I get there, I thought.

It wasn’t a second or two more when I miraculously heard the voice of a man coming from my radio earpiece, and my life changed.

Stay tuned to see a video post and the rest of Mission 1 !

PLEASE NOTE:

This post is a fictional, fun account of my journey using the iOS and Android app called Zombies, Run! by Six to Start. Six to Start was gracious enough to provide me with all the audio for Mission 1 in their game. The game combines a regular running app that tracks your stats with a story that fills in between the songs on your playlist. Each “Mission” is around 30 – 40 minutes. I will be keeping a fictional journal of these Missions as I complete each run. Although I have already completed a number of them, I have decided to start from Mission 1 for the purpose of this blog.

 

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